The Origins Of The Phrase “Blow Job”

Does it bother you that the phrase “blow job” describes something that involves no blowing at all? Wouldn’t “suck job” be a more accurate description here? We had to find out what was going on.

The real tipping point for the phrase being commonly use was Andy Warhol’s 1963 film, “Blow Job.” It was a silent portrayal of a dude receiving the act in the title for 35 minutes. That is apparently the whole flick, and the IMDB page for it only credits “the giver” and “the receiver” as appearing. After this movie, ‘blow job’ started to appear in dictionaries and the rest is history.

During the 1940s and 50s in America, extremely fast airplanes were affectionately called blow jobs because anyone near the place of take off received a blow job. (Not literally you fiends, we mean their hair was blown back.)

Some experts believe the phrase developed from the phrase to “blow off” as in to blow off steam. Hookers in the 1930s would offer to “blow you off” meaning that they would release the steam of your arousal, or cool you down.

Another possibility goes back even further to 18th century Europe, where a prostitute was known as a “blower.” The reason for this is that a slang term for a penis at the time was a “whorepipe,” and the prostitute playing the instrument was the blower.

It is hard to point to one of these as the exact point where the phrase started, but it is interesting to look back on the things we all take for granted sometimes. Plus it just sounds better than suck job anyway.

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